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Rowlatt Act 1919 GK Notes

Rowlatt Act 1919 | [Important GK Notes + PDF]

Rowlatt Act 1919 General Knowledge

Contents:
Introduction to Rowlatt Act 1919
Purposes of Rowlatt Bill 1919
Effects of Rowlatt Act 1919
Important Points to Know About the bill


Rowlatt Act bill (1919) is also known as the Anarchical and Revolutionary Crimes Act of 1919 or the Black Act of 1919. This bill was introduced at the Imperial Legislative Council of Delhi on 10th March 1919.

At the end of World War I, The British government was preparing to suppress the Indian revolutionaries. At this time the oppression of nationalists was going on. Also, Terrorists and revolutionaries were found out and put into Jail. Many nationalist leaders like Abdul Kalam Azad were kept in jail. At that time, the British government decided to suppress the Indian side with more power and as a result, The Rowlatt Act bill was passed by British judge Sir Sidney Rowlatt on 10th March 1919. This act was passed to extend the Defense of India Regulations Act 1915.

Read Also : 250+ Modern Indian History MCQ Objective Question Answer [PDF]

# Purposes of Rowlatt Bill 1919:

⇒ Even though every member of the Legislative Assembly opposed, the British government forced to pass the law.

⇒ Through this law, the government could have kept any person in jail for up to two years without trial and could convict him in court.

⇒ The purpose of the act was to restrain the growing nationalist upheaval within the country.

⇒ Through this act, police can search any palace or home without any warrant.

By this act, the British government could dominate the rights of a habeas corpus on any Indian.

Read Also : History  List of Governor-Generals  Viceroys of Bengal  India PDF

# Effects of Rowlatt Act 1919:

Rowlatt Satyagraha: Rowlatt Act was a big blow to the people of India. As a result, strong and powerful movements were developed in India against this law. During this movement, Mahatma Gandhi asserted the national movement of India. To protest this bill Gandhiji started Rowlatt Satyagraha on 6th April that year. He started a new kind of struggle that was non-cooperation movement.

Jaliwanwallabagh massacre: At that time the viceroy of India was Lord Chelmsford. On 13th April a large number of non-violative people were gathered to protest this act at Jaliwanwalabagh public garden in Amritsar situated in the state Punjab. General Dyer came there, closed the narrow gate and ordered without any warning to shoot down the innocent people gathered there. As a result, around a thousand people were instantly dead including children and women. More than 1600 people were injured. This incident is known as the Jaliwanwallabagh massacre.

# Important Points to Know About Rowlatt Act 1919:

Dear reader, if you are preparing for any kind of competitive examinations such as IAS, UPSC Civil Service, Railway NTPC, Banking SSC, CGL, etc then these points given below are very important. These points are essential for general knowledge purposes.

⇒ Anarchical and Revolutionary Crimes Act of 1919 is also known as the Rowlatt Act or Black bill.
⇒ Rowlatt Act was passed on 10th March 1919 by Sir Sidney Rowlatt.
⇒ The main objective of this act is to suppress the Indian revolutionaries by any efforts.
⇒ To oppose this bill Mahatma Gandhi assured to non-cooperate with British across India by starting satyagraha and Non-Cooperative movement.
⇒ The most atrocious or brutal effect of the Rowlatt Act in Indian history is the Jaliwanwallbagh massacre on 13th April 1919.
⇒ During this period the viceroy of India was Lord Chelmsford.

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GK> Swadeshi and Boycott Movement [Important Points + Note PDF]
GK> Partition of Bengal 1905 [Important Points + Notes PDF]

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Swadeshi and Boycott Movement

GK> Swadeshi and Boycott Movement [Important Points + Note PDF]

Swadeshi and Boycott Movement General Knowledge

Introduction of Swadeshi and Boycott Movement: Lord Curzon appeared in Indian politics during the national movement of India. Since he came to India, the sensitive issues in India and Indians became the challenging problem of his administration.

The partition of Bengal made due to his aggressive policy. In the protest of the division of Bengal, an incursive movement of the entire Bengal was developed. This is known as the Swadeshi movement. At the beginning of the movement, Surendranath Banerjee, and later took over the responsibility of Bipin Chandra Pal and Aurobindo Ghosh.

Read Also: GK> Partition of Bengal 1905 [Important Points + Notes PDF]

The Effects partition of Bengal and Swadeshi & boycott movement:

⇒ In 1905 (20 July), when Lord Curzon announced the partition of Bengal with the intention of imperialism, a severe reaction was made at the whole of Bengal. There were demands for cancellation of criticism of this decision in various sessions.

⇒ Under the leadership of Surendranath Bandopadhyay, a protective movement had begun against the partition of Bengal. On 7 August 1905, a huge public meeting at Kolkata took a decision to boycott British products unanimously.

⇒ Swadeshi Movement had expended to Bihar, Uttar Pradesh, Maharashtra, and Deccan with the efforts of Bal Gangadhar Tilak, Lala Lajpat Rai, and other nationalists.

⇒ Boycotting the foreign goods was expended in the major cities of India. A large number of foreign goods such as salt, cloths, wine, etc were damaged and fired due to the violation of Indian extremists. At that time Indians were established swadeshi factories. Prafulla Chandra Roy established “Bengal Chemical”. Chidambaram Pillai built indigenous Ships. Also, Sir Jamshedji Tata has set up a famous iron-steel plant in Jamshedpur.

Also Read: History> The Advent of Europeans in India Notes

Repression policy against Swadesi and Boycot movement by British:

⇒ The British government, frightened by the Swadeshi movement, adopted a repressive policy on banning the public meeting, punishing people, imprisonment, and took away the liberty of newspapers.

⇒ To prevent the student association from the movement, on October 10, 1905, the ‘Carlyle Circular’ was issued.

⇒ British ban the publication of sensitive newspapers such as “sandhya“, “Yugantar” etc.

⇒ British also tried to keep apart the Muslim community form this movement through discrimination policy.

Also Read: History> List of Governors-General & Viceroys of Bengal of India PDF

The weakness of the swadeshi and boycott movement:

⇒ The public foundation of this movement was not strong.

⇒ The movement did not have a spiritual connection with the farmers and laborers.

⇒ The leaders of the movement did not emphasize raising communal harmony and solidarity that created communal riots in Bengal.

Results of Swadeshi and Boycott Movement:

⇒ Apparently, the swadeshi movement seems to be failed, it did not fail really.

⇒ Under the pressure of mass movement and public influence, the British government had withdrawn the decision of partition of Bengal in 1911.

⇒ As a result, the divided Bengal merge into a whole Bengal in 1911.

⇒ Swadeshi Movement again started a new chapter in the history of India’s freedom struggle. As a result, the Indian national movement got a new direction for the freedom of India.

Some important points on Swadeshi and Boycott movement:

⇒ The decision of Swadeshi and Boycott movement was taken on August 7, 1905, at the Calcutta Town Hall.
⇒ Swadeshi and Boycott movement had arisen to protest the division of Bengal.
⇒ Lord Curzon was the Viceroy of India during the Swadeshi Movement.
⇒ Gopal Krishna Gokhale set up “Swadesh Bandhab Samiti” to proclaim the Swadeshi Movement.
⇒ Dadabhai Naoroji was president of INC at the time of the Swadeshi Movement.
⇒ Persons who involved in swadeshi and boycott movement are Surendranath Banerjee, BG Tilak, Bipin Chandra Pal, Lala Lajpat Rai, Aurobindo Ghosh, Chidambaram Pillai
British government rejoins the parted Bengal in 1911.
Mahatma Gandhi was not a part of this movement.

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Partition of Bengal 1905 Facts

GK> Partition of Bengal 1905 [Important Points + Notes PDF]

Partition of Bengal 1905 Facts and General Knowledge

Partition of Bengal 1905 is also known as Banga Vanga Andolon in India. In the first decade of the twentieth century, the partition of Bengal started to create the strong national movement of the extremists in India.

What was the reason behind the partition of Bengal 1905?

Causes Shown by British:

The geographical area of Bengal was very large and due to this, for British, it was going to be difficult to control throughout the Bengal easily.

At that time there were approximately 55 million people in greater Bengal out of them 18 million were Bengali speaking people and rest 37 million were Hindi ( or Bihari) and Oriya speaking people. So British govt wanted to split Bengal into two-part. One is East Bengal (Bengal and Assam) with muslim populated region and another part is Western Bengal (Bihar Odisha and a small part of Bengal) with Hindu.

At this time a large number of experienced political leaders were Presented in Bengal who had the capacity to influence and guide political agitation. And they were going to be more popular and stronger against the British govt in India. This was uncomfortable for the British to rule and loot effectively from India.

But the British govt showed a reason that this partition will help to develop the eastern region economically and culturally. Because in the eastern part, Muslims were in the majority. They thought that they can take economical advantages against Hindu.

That’s why the British government wanted to divide the Bengal.

Read More : History> The Advent of Europeans in India Notes

Actual Causes of Lord Curzon behind the partition of Bengal:

Actually, these were not the original reason behind the partition of Bengal 1905. Lord Curzon planned to divide Bengal for weakening British critics and opposition political power in Bengal.

Some people also consider that to suppress the nationalist and as well as the unity of Bengali people, British govt forcefully wanted to divide the Bengal.

Lord Curzon’s actual motive was political and not administrative. He wanted to destroy the good relation of Hindu with the minority Muslim community (I.e in the religious ground).

Also tried to suppress or inhibit the influence of educated middle-class person (and congress) to uneducated, poor Hindu and Muslim. And for this Lord Curzon adopted the idea of “divide and rule“.

Read More: Religious Movements: Buddhism and Jainism - GK

Implementation the idea of partition of Bengal

In the year 1874, Assam was separated from Bengal as a distinct region.

The British government planned to separate Bengal on 19th July 1905.

In this year (1905) 16th October, the plan of partition of Bengal was officially implemented.

Effects of Partition of Bengal:

Boycott and the swadeshi movement were arisen due to this proposal of the partition of Bengal by Lord Curzon.

At the end of this movement, the real form of extremism had appeared as a model of modern Indian national movement.

The educated Indian as well as INC (Indian National Congress) oppose the matter and tried to push an effort to enlarge the national movement of India in the right direction.

Reunion of Bengal

Due to huge political protest such as Swadeshi and boycott movement throughout India. These two parts of Bengal is reunited in 1911

Because of gigantic political challenges, for example, Swadeshi and boycott movement throughout India, these two parts of Bengal are brought together in 1911. Be that as it may, the division of Bengal made based on language instead of religious ground.

Read Also: Rowlatt Act 1919 | [Important GK Notes + PDF]

Important facts to Remember regarding Bengal partition:

If you are preparing for any kind of competitive examinations like IAS, UPSC, SSC, CGL, MTS, Railway group C D exams Defence, Police, then you should remember these important points about the partition of Bengal in 1905.

⇒ The government reported the thought for the partition of Bengal in January 1904.
⇒ The thought was restricted by Henry John Stedman Cotton, Chief Commissioner of Assam.
⇒ Partition of Bengal proceeded and implemented officially on October 16, 1905, by Viceroy Lord Curzon.
Mahatma Gandhi was not the chief architect of the Swadeshi Movement caused by the partition of Bengal.
⇒ At this time the viceroy of India was Lord Minto.
⇒ On 12 December 1911, the partition of Bengal was revoked.
⇒ Hardinge II was the viceroy of Bengal when the Bengal partition was canceled.
⇒ Gopal Krishna was the president of INC during this time.

TRY : 250+ Modern Indian History MCQ Objective Question Answer [PDF]

Read Also: GK> Swadeshi and Boycott Movement [Important Points + Note PDF]

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List of Important Dams in India state wise pdf

GK> Major Dams of India state wise – Important List – PDF

List of Important Dams in India state wise pdf

Major Dams in India pdf> In this post we are providing you some important names of dams state wise in India. Remembering these dams as a general knowledge (gk) format is very useful for any kind of competitive examinations in India. In every exams, it is possible that at least one or two questions may come in your exam. So If you are preparing for IAS, UPSC prelims, SSC, CGL, ChSL, MTS or Railway exam, defense exams, CDS, Tax dept and Insurance related exams then this post is going to be very helpful.

The biggest Dam in India is Tehri Dam located in Uttarakhand (height: 261 meter)
Bhakra Nangal Dam located at Himachal Pradesh is the second largest dam in Asia

Important Dams in Andhra Pradesh


# Srisailam Dam

River: Krishna River

Location: Kurnool ‎district, Andhra Pradesh

Built in: 1981

Spillway capacity: 38369 cumecs

Water holding capacity: 178.74 Tmcft

# Kalyani Dam

River: Swarnamukhi River

Location: Tirupati (Chittoor Dist)

Built in: 1977

Water Holding Capacity: 25 million cubic meters

# Veligallu Dam

River: Papagni River

Location: Galiveedu (kadappa Dist)

Built in: 2002

Water Holding Capacity: 4.64 Tmcft

# Somasila Dam

River: Penna River

Location: Somasila (Nellore dist)

Opening date‎: ‎1989

Water Holding Capacity: 75 tmcft.

# Kandaleru Dam

River: Kandaleru River

Location: Rapur Mandal (Nellore Dist)

Built in: 2017

Water Holding Capacity: 5.12 tmcft


List of Important Dams in Arunachal Pradesh


# Subansiri Dam

River: Subansiri River

Location: Lower Subansiri dist

Built in: 2008

Water Holding Capacity: 3,000 million cubic feet

Spillway capacity: 37,500 m3/s

# Ranganadi Dam

River: Ranganadi River

Location: Lower Subansiri district

Built in: 2001

Water Holding Capacity: 523,000,000 m3


List of Important Dams in Bihar


# Nagi Dam

River: Nagi River

Location: Jamui District

Built in: 2014

# Durgawati Dam

River: Durgawati River

Location: Bhabhua (Kaimur Dist)

Built in: 2014

# Chandan Dam

River: Chandan River

Location: Banka Dist


List of Important Dams in Chhattisgarh


# Kutaghat Dam

River: Kharang River

Location: Bilaspur Dist

Built in: 1926

# Gangrel Dam

River: Mahanadi River

Location: Dhamtari Dist

Built in: 1979

Water Holding Capacity: 1,776,000 m3

Spillway capacity: 17,230 m3/s

# Minimata (Hasdeo) Bango Dam

River: Hasdeo River

Location: Korba Dist

Constructed in: 1962

Water Holding Capacity: 3,045 million m3

# Dudhawa Dam

River: Mahanadi River

Location: Dhamtari Dist

Opening date: 1963-64


List of Important Dams in Gujarat


# Sardar Sarovar Dam

River: Narmada River

Location: Navagam, Tapi district

Opening Date: 17 September 2017

Water Holding Capacity: 5.8 km3

Spillway capacity: 84,949 m3/s

# Ukai Dam

River: Tapti River

Location: Surat district and Tapi district

Built in: 1971

Water Holding Capacity: 7,414 m3

Spillway capacity: 46,269 m3/s

# Dantiwada Dam

River: Banas River

Location: Banaskantha district

Opening date: 1965

Water Holding Capacity: 464 Mm3

Spillway capacity: 7504 m3/s

# Kamleshwar Dam

River: Hiran River

Location: Junagadh district

Opening date: 1959

Water Holding Capacity: 447,000 m3

# Kandana Dam

River: Mahi River

Location: Mahisagar district

Opening date: 1989

Water Holding Capacity: 1,203,000,000 m3


List of Important Dams in Punjab


# Bhakra Nangal Dam

River: Sutlej River

Location: Rupnagar

Opening date: 1963

Water Holding Capacity: 9.340 km3

# Ranjit Sagar (Thein) Dam

River: Ravi River

Location: Gurdaspur

Built in: 2001

Water Holding Capacity: 3,280,000,000 m3

Spillway capacity: 24,600 m3/s


List of Important in Himachal Pradesh


# Chamera Dam

River: Ravi River

Location: Chamba district

Built in: 2010

Water Holding Capacity: 110 MCN

# Maharana Pratap Sagar Dam

River: Beas River

Location: Kangra district

Built in: 1975

Water Holding Capacity: 8,570 million cubic metres

# Pandoh Dam

River: Beas River

Location: Mandi district

Opening date: 1977

Water Holding Capacity: 1,580,000 m3

Spillway capacity: 9,940 m3/s


List of Important Dams in Jammu & Kashmir


# Uri Dam

River: Jhelum River

Location: Baramulla district

Built in: 1989

# Shahpurkandi Dam

River: Ravi River

Location: Pathankot district

Built in: 2014

# Baglihar Dam

River: Chenab River

Location: Ramban district

Opening date: 2008

Water Holding Capacity: 32,560,000 m3

Spillway capacity: 16,500 m3/s


List of Important Dams in Jharkhand


# Panchet Dam

River: Damodar River

Location: Dhanbad district

Built in: 1959

Water Holding Capacity: 1497.5 million m3

Spillway capacity: 17853 m³/s

# Konar Dam

River: Konar River

Location: Hazaribagh District, Jharkhand

Built in: 1955

# Tenughat Dam

River: Damodar River

Location: Bokaro district

Built in: 1974

Water Holding Capacity: 6,300 AC feet


List of Important dams in Karnataka


# Linganamakki Dam

River: Sharavathi

Location: Shimoga district

Built in: 1964

Water Holding Capacity:  4.45 km3

# Supa Dam

River: The Kali River

Location: Uttara Kannada district

Built in: 1987

Water Holding Capacity: 4.20 km3

# Tungabhadra Dam

River: Tungabhadra River

Location: Ballari district

Built in: 1953

Water Holding Capacity: 3.75  km3

# Almatti Dam

River: Krishna

Location: Bijapur district

Built in: 1999

Water Holding Capacity: 3.50 km3

# Bhadra Dam

River: Bhadra river

Location: Chikkamagaluru district

Built in: 1965

Water Holding Capacity: 2.02 km3

# Raja Lakhamagowda dam

River: Ghataprabha river

Location: Belgaum district

Built in: 1977

Water Holding Capacity: 1.45 km3


List of Important Dams in Kerala


# Chimmony Dam

River: Kurumali River

Location:  Thrissur district

Built in: 1996

# Idukki Dam

River: Periyar River

Location: Idukki district

Built in: 1973

Water Holding Capacity: 1,460×106 m3

# Thenmala Dam

River: Kallada River

Location: Kollam city

Built in: 1986

Water Holding Capacity: 507,000,000 m3

# Malampuzha Dam

River: Bharathapuzha River

Location: Palakkad city

Built in: 1955

Water Holding Capacity: 226 Mm3

# Kakki Dam

River: Pamba River

Location: Pathanamthitta district

Built in: 1966

Water Holding Capacity: 0.46 km3


List of Important Dams in Madhya Pradesh


# Bansagar Dam

River: Son

Location: Shahdol district

Built in: 2006

Water Holding Capacity: 5.41 km3

# Bargi Dam

River: Narmada River

Location: Jabalpur District

Built in: 1988

# Indirasagar Dam

River: Narmada River

Location: Khandwa district

Built in: 2005

Water Holding Capacity: 9.47 KM3

# Gandhi Sagar Dam

River: Chambal

Location: Mandsaur District,

Built in: 1960

Water Holding Capacity: 7.31 KM3

# Omkareshwar Dam

River: Narmada River

Location: Khandwa district,

Built in: 2007

Water Holding Capacity: 27,877 m3

# Kolar Dam

River: Kolar river

Location: Nagpur district

Built in: 1984

Water Holding Capacity: 1,084 km3

# Barna Dam

River: Barna River

Location: Raisen district

Built in: 1978

Water Holding Capacity: 0.45 km3


List of Important Dams in Maharastra


# Hetwane Dam

River: Bhogeshwari

Location: Raigad district

Built in: 2000

Water Holding Capacity: 137,625 km3

# Jayakwadi Dam

River: Godavari river

Location: Aurangabad and Jalna district

Built in: 1976

Water Holding Capacity: 3 km3

# Gose Khurd Dam

River: Wainganga

Location: Bhandara District

Built in: 1984

Water Holding Capacity: 740×106 m3

# Bhatsa Dam

River: Bhatsa river

Location: Thane district

Built in: 1983

Water Holding Capacity: 9.42 km3

# Mahamadwadi Dam

River: Gad river

Location: Sindhudurg district

Built in: 2012

Water Holding Capacity: 9.1 km3

# Veer Baaji Pasalkar Dam or Varasgaon Dam

River: Mosi river

Location: Pune city

Built in: 1976


List of Important Dams in Odisha


# Hirakud Dam

River: Mahanadi River

Location: Sambalpur city

Built in: 1957

Water Holding Capacity: 5.82 km3

# Rengali Dam

River: Brahmani River

Location: Angul district

Built in: 1975

Water Holding Capacity: 4,400 million m3

# Balimela Reservoir

River: Sileru River

Location: Malkangiri district

Built in: 1988

Water Holding Capacity: 2.67 km3

# Jalaput Dam

River: Machkund River

Location: Visakhapatnam District

Built in: 2000

Water Holding Capacity: 1 km3


List of Important Dams in Rajasthan


# Gandhi Sagar Dam

River: Chambal River

Location: Neemuch districts

Built in: 1960

Water Holding Capacity: 7.3 km3

# Rana Pratap Sagar Dam

River: Chambal River

Location: Chittorgarh District,

Built in: 1970

Water Holding Capacity: 1.56 km3

# Mahi Bajaj Sagar Dam

River: Mahi River

Location: Banswara district

Built in: 1983

Water Holding Capacity: 2.06 km3

# Bisalpur Dam

River: Banas River

Location: Tonk district

Built in: 1999

Water Holding Capacity: 1.04 km3


List of Important Dams in Tamil Nadu


# Mettur Dam

River: Kaveri, river

Location: Salem District

Built in: 1934

Water Holding Capacity: 2.64 km3

# Bhavanisagar dam

River: Bhavani river

Location: Erode distric

Built in: 1955

Water Holding Capacity: 0.92 km3

# Vaigai Dam

River: Vaigai River

Location: Theni district

Built in: 1959

Water Holding Capacity: 0.173 km3


List of Important Dams in Telangana


# Sriram Sagar Project

River: Godavari

Location: Nizamabad district

Built in: 1977

Water Holding Capacity: 3.17 km3

# Singur Dam

River: Manjira river

Location: Sangareddy distric

Built in: 1998

Water Holding Capacity: 2.56 km3

# Sripada Yellampalli project

River: Godavari River

Location: Peddapalli district

Built in: 2016

Water Holding Capacity: 0.57 km3

# Lower Manair Dam

River: Manair River

Location: Karimnagar District,

Built in: 1985

Water Holding Capacity: 0.68 km3

# Mid Manair Dam

River: Manair Rive

Location: Rajanna Sircilla district,

Built in: 2005

Water Holding Capacity: 0.73 km3


List of Important Dams in Uttarakhand


# Lakhwar Dam

River: Yamuna river

Location: Dehradun district

Built in: 1987

Water Holding Capacity: 0.68 km3

# Tehri Dam

River: Bhagirathi River

Location: Tehri Garhwal District

Built in: 2006

Water Holding Capacity: 4.0 km3

# Koteshwar Dam

River: Bhagirathi River

Location: Tehri District

Built in: 2011

Water Holding Capacity: 88,900,000 m3


List of Important Dams in Uttar Pradesh


# Rihand Dam

River: Rihand River

Location: Sonbhadra District

Built in: 1962

Water Holding Capacity: 10.6 billion cubic metres

# Matatila Dam

River: Betwa River

Location: district Lalitpur

Built in: 1958

# Dhanraul Dam

River: river Ghagha

Location: Sonbhadra district

Built in: 1917


List of Important Dams in West Bengal


# Durgapur Barrage

River: Damodar Rive

Location: Bankura district & Paschim Bardhaman district

Built in: 1955

# Farakka Barrage

River: Ganges Rive

Location: Murshidabad district

Built in: 1972

# Panchet Dam

River: Damodar River

Location: Purulia and Dhanbad district

Built in: 1959

Water Holding Capacity: 1497.54 million m3

# Mukutmanipur Dam

River: Kangsabati River

Location: Bankura district

Built in: 1956

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[MCQ] Input and Output Device of Computer - with answers [PDF]

[MCQ] Input and Output Device of Computer – with answers [PDF]

Input Output Device Based MCQ

MCQs on input and output devices (GK Objective Question Answer) exam question answer for competitive exam of govt jobs. Now a day computer is one of the most important field for every examinations. So dear reader I have provided top expected gk questions from input and output device of computer.

Q.1 Which device use infrared signal to operate or control other device remotely?

A: Remote control

B: Sensor

C: Mouse

D: Touchpad

Answer

Remote control

Q.2 Default pointing device of a laptop is –

A: Optical mouse

B: Sensitive screen

C: Touchpad

D: Tappad

Answer

Touchpad

Q.3  Which is an example of pointing device?

A: Mouse

B: Pointer

C: Cursor

D: HDMI port

Answer

Mouse

Q.4 Which among the following is the most common device that accepts letters, numbers and command from a user?

A: Optical Mouse

B: Sensitive Screen or touch screen

C: Keyboard

D: USB

Answer

Keyboard

Q.5 What type of keyboard is used in fast food restaurants, offices and shops?

A: Numeric keypads

B: Numeric Keyboard

C: Concept keyboard

D: Concise keyboard

Answer

Concept keyboard

Q.6 What type of keyboard is used in telephone and ATMs?

A: Numeric keyboard

B: Numeric keypad

C: Folding keyboard

D: Any type of keyboard

Answer

Numeric keyboard

Q.7 Which input device is used to read magnetic stripes?

A: Stripe reader

B: Bar code reader

C: Magnetic stripe reader

D: All the above

Answer

Magnetic stripe reader

8. Which device containing sensors send signals to computer whenever light changes are detected?

A: Light pen

B: Reflectors

C: Deflector

D: All the above

Answer

Light pen

9. Which is used with stylus to produce freehand drawings?

A: Drawing pen

B: Reflector

C: Graphic tablets

D: Light pen

Answer

Graphic tablets

10. Among the options which of the following computer input device enable video conference?

A: Microphone

B: Digital Camera

C: Voice recognition

D: Webcam

Answer

Webcam

11. Which input device allow only voice communication?

A: Microphone

B: Webcam

C: Voice recognition

D: All of Above

Answer

Microphone

12. Which system can read special characters printed in special ink?

A: Optical Scanner

B: Magnetic Ink character recognition or MICR

C: QCR

D: OPR

Answer

MICR

13. Which computer application scan text and converts into readable form in computer?

A: Optical Scanner Reader

B: Optical Marker Recognition

C: Optical character Recognition

D: Optical character evaluator

Answer

Optical character recognition

14. What is output device?

A: It allow data to be output from a computer

B; It allow to print data

C: It allow to store data

D: It allow to read internal data for processing

Which option(s) is/are correct?

Answer

Option A and B both correct.

15. A control device is –

A: it control the computer.

B: It control the printout.

C: It is another type of output devices.

Which option is correct?

Answer

It is another type of output device.

16. Which output device of a computer is used for training presentations?

A: Plotters

B: Multimedia projectors

C: Computer monitor

D: Inject or laser printer

Answer

Multimedia projectors

17. Which is used to output sound from multimedia presentations?

A: External Speaker

B: Keynoter

C: Announcer

D: Elocutionists

Answer

External Speaker

18. Which output device of a computer used for producing highly accurate, very large drawings and poster?

A: Plotter

B: dot matrix printer

C: Inkjet printers

D: Laser printers

Answer

Plotter

19. Which is a kind of impact printers?

A: Plotter

B: Dot matrix printer

C: Laser printer

D: Inkjet printer

Answer

Dot matrix printer

20. Which produce good quality of hard copies?

A: Plotter

B: Dot matrix printer

C: Laser printer

D: Inkjet printer

Answer

Inkjet printer

21. Which is the least expensive type of monitor?

A: CRT monitors

B: TFT monitors

C: LED monitor

D: LCD monitor

Answer

CRT monitor.

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